Team | Monkey Mind Yoga - Maddie Lynch
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maddie

What where your true and honest (even mundane) motivations to pick up Yoga initially, and what did it yield for you personally until now?

I discovered yoga during my first year of university whilst studying Psychology. One of my modules was the psychology of appearance and embodiment, and we dived into the amazing psychological benefits of yoga (such as no longer seeing the body as an object to be compared or judged). They introduced weekly classes at the uni, and I loved it so much that I also began taking classes outside of uni too. I absolutely fell in love with yoga, and it certainly helped me to manage my stress levels during my exams. 

 

What is your background and which aspects do reflect in your lessons?

I completed my 200 hour Hatha & Ashtanga Vinyasa Yoga Teacher Training in Rishikesh, India. What I really resonated about learning to teach in India, was the importance placed upon the spiritual and philosophical aspects of Yoga (rather than viewing Yoga just as a physical practice as it often is in the West). I’m also a Reiki Master, and with my background in Psychology, I love to integrate many holistic areas into my classes. With the intention of allowing my students to feel connected, empowered and deeply relaxed. You’ll find me teaching mainly dynamic Vinyasa Flow classes, as I love the fluidity of the movements, representing the flow of life.

 

What is your greatest discovery and which one the biggest illusion in Yoga?

My greatest discovery in Yoga was that the physical asana practice is merely one tiny aspect of Yoga (with more importance on living ethically, which is reflected in the Yamas). I’ve come to learn that the true practice of Yoga is when you are off the mat and living in the daily life. I would say that the biggest illusion about Yoga, is the idea that to be a yogi, you have to fit into this wholesome stereotype of the “perfect person”. I think this false assumption of yogis is so limiting, and it’s much more important to live up to your true authentic self, rather than what society is expecting you to be. 

(c) yvonne schmedemann

maddie

What where your true and honest (even mundane) motivations to pick up Yoga initially, and what did it yield for you personally until now?

I discovered yoga during my first year of university whilst studying Psychology. One of my modules was the psychology of appearance and embodiment, and we dived into the amazing psychological benefits of yoga (such as no longer seeing the body as an object to be compared or judged). They introduced weekly classes at the uni, and I loved it so much that I also began taking classes outside of uni too. I absolutely fell in love with yoga, and it certainly helped me to manage my stress levels during my exams. 

 

What is your background and which aspects do reflect in your lessons?

I completed my 200 hour Hatha & Ashtanga Vinyasa Yoga Teacher Training in Rishikesh, India. What I really resonated about learning to teach in India, was the importance placed upon the spiritual and philosophical aspects of Yoga (rather than viewing Yoga just as a physical practice as it often is in the West). I’m also a Reiki Master, and with my background in Psychology, I love to integrate many holistic areas into my classes. With the intention of allowing my students to feel connected, empowered and deeply relaxed. You’ll find me teaching mainly dynamic Vinyasa Flow classes, as I love the fluidity of the movements, representing the flow of life.

 

What is your greatest discovery and which one the biggest illusion in Yoga?

My greatest discovery in Yoga was that the physical asana practice is merely one tiny aspect of Yoga (with more importance on living ethically, which is reflected in the Yamas). I’ve come to learn that the true practice of Yoga is when you are off the mat and living in the daily life. I would say that the biggest illusion about Yoga, is the idea that to be a yogi, you have to fit into this wholesome stereotype of the “perfect person”. I think this false assumption of yogis is so limiting, and it’s much more important to live up to your true authentic self, rather than what society is expecting you to be. 

(c) yvonne schmedemann